Birds of PEI

Records exist for 368 species of birds recorded on Prince Edward Island.

Record keeping of PEI birds has been reliant on individuals who recorded sightings. The PEI Birders Mailing List is a key component in ensuring those sightings become part of permanent ornithological records. All postings from 2005 forward are available from their archived records. To post to the list you first subscribe to the list by following the second link below:

Peibirders mailing list
Peibirders@lists.upei.ca
http://lists.upei.ca/listinfo/peibirders

Field Check List of Birds 8th edition (2014) is published by the PEI provincial government in pdf format and is available for download.

The Island Naturalist (newsletter of Nature PEI) has for 50 years maintained natural history records and you can submit records to the editor directly. Back issues from 2006 to present are available.

e-bird Canada as a project of Bird Studies Canada, provides an important repository for records as well, with many birders submitting sighting directly through that site.

Birding on PEI a Facebook community page is a great birding resource.

Check out the new site Birds of Prince Edward Island.

Below is the annual listing of PEI sightings recorded for the past year thanks to David Seeler and the PEI Birder mailing list:

Year   # of species recorded

2003    236
2004    249
2005    261
2006    247
2007    245
2008    251
2009    243
2010    236
2011    241 
2012    240
2013    244
2014    245
2015    233
2016    231
2017    238
________________________________________________
2017 Sightings

SPECIES Reported: 238

DUCKS, GEESE, AND WATERFOWL
Greater White-fronted Goose
Snow Goose
Brant
Cackling Goose
Canada Goose
Wood Duck
Gadwall
Eurasian Wigeon
American Wigeon
American Black Duck
Mallard
Blue-winged Teal
Northern Shoveler
Northern Pintail
Green-winged Teal
Redhead
Ring-necked Duck
Greater Scaup
Lesser Scaup
Common Eider
Harlequin Duck
Surf Scoter
White-winged Scoter
Black Scoter
Long-tailed Duck
Bufflehead
Common Goldeneye
Barrow’s Goldeneye
Hooded Merganser
Common Merganser
Red-breasted Merganser
Ruddy Duck

PHEASANTS, GROUSE, AND ALLIES
Ring-necked Pheasant
Gray Partridge
Ruffed Grouse
Sharp-tailed Grouse

LOONS
Red-throated Loon
Common Loon

GREBES
Pied-billed Grebe
Red-necked Grebe

SHEARWATERS AND PETRELS
Great Shearwater
Sooty Shearwater

STORM-PETRELS
Wilson’s Storm-Petrel

BOOBIES AND GANNETS
Northern Gannet

CORMORANTS AND SHAGS
Great Cormorant
Double-crested Cormorant

PELICANS
American White Pelican

HERONS, EGRETS, AND BITTERNS
American Bittern
Great Blue Heron
Great Egret
Cattle Egret

NEW WORLD VULTURES
Turkey Vulture

OSPREY
Osprey

HAWKS, EAGLES, AND KITES
Northern Harrier
Sharp-shinned Hawk
Northern Goshawk
Bald Eagle
Broad-winged Hawk
Red-tailed Hawk
Rough-legged Hawk

RAILS, GALLINULES, AND COOTS
Virginia Rail
Sora

CRANES
Sandhill Crane

PLOVERS AND LAPWINGS
Black-bellied Plover
American Golden-Plover
Semipalmated Plover
Piping Plover
Killdeer

SANDPIPERS AND ALLIES
Upland Sandpiper
Whimbrel
Hudsonian Godwit
Ruddy Turnstone
Red Knot
Ruff
Stilt Sandpiper
Sanderling
Dunlin
Baird’s Sandpiper
Least Sandpiper
White-rumped Sandpiper
Pectoral Sandpiper
Semipalmated Sandpiper
Short-billed Dowitcher
Long-billed Dowitcher
Wilson’s Snipe
American Woodcock
Wilson’s Phalarope
Spotted Sandpiper
Solitary Sandpiper
Greater Yellowlegs
Willet
Lesser Yellowlegs

SKUAS AND JAEGERS
Pomarine Jaeger
Parasitic Jaeger

AUKS, MURRES, AND PUFFINS
Dovekie
Common Murre
Thick-billed Murre
Razorbill
Black Guillemot
Atlantic Puffin

GULLS, TERNS, AND SKIMMERS
Black-legged Kittiwake
Bonaparte’s Gull
Black-headed Gull
Little Gull
Ring-billed Gull
Herring Gull
Thayer’s Gull
Iceland Gull
Lesser Black-backed Gull
Glaucous Gull
Great Black-backed Gull
Caspian Tern
Common Tern
Arctic Tern

PIGEONS AND DOVES
Rock Pigeon
Mourning Dove

CUCKOOS
Black-billed Cuckoo

OWLS
Great Horned Owl
Snowy Owl
Barred Owl
Long-eared Owl
Short-eared Owl
Northern Saw-whet Owl

NIGHTJARS AND ALLIES
Common Nighthawk

HUMMINGBIRDS
Ruby-throated Hummingbird

KINGFISHERS
Belted Kingfisher

WOODPECKERS
Red-bellied Woodpecker
Yellow-bellied Sapsucker
Downy Woodpecker
Hairy Woodpecker
American Three-toed Woodpecker
Black-backed Woodpecker
Northern Flicker
Pileated Woodpecker
FALCONS AND CARACARAS
American Kestrel
Merlin
Peregrine Falcon

TYRANT FLYCATCHERS
Olive-sided Flycatcher
Eastern Wood-Pewee
Yellow-bellied Flycatcher
Alder Flycatcher
Least Flycatcher
Eastern Phoebe
Great Crested Flycatcher
Eastern Kingbird

SHRIKES
Northern Shrike

VIREOS, SHRIKE-BABBLERS, ERPORNIS
Blue-headed Vireo
Philadelphia Vireo
Red-eyed Vireo

CROWS, JAYS, AND MAGPIES
Gray Jay
Blue Jay
American Crow
Common Raven

LARKS
Horned Lark

SWALLOWS
Tree Swallow
Bank Swallow
Barn Swallow
Cliff Swallow

TITS, CHICKADEES, AND TITMICE
Black-capped Chickadee
Boreal Chickadee

NUTHATCHES
Red-breasted Nuthatch
White-breasted Nuthatch

TREECREEPERS
Brown Creeper

WRENS
Winter Wren
Sedge Wren

KINGLETS
Golden-crowned Kinglet
Ruby-crowned Kinglet

THRUSHES AND ALLIES
Eastern Bluebird
Veery
Gray-cheeked Thrush
Swainson’s Thrush
Hermit Thrush
American Robin

MOCKINGBIRDS AND THRASHERS
Gray Catbird
Brown Thrasher
Northern Mockingbird

STARLINGS
European Starling

WAGTAILS AND PIPITS
American Pipit

WAXWINGS
Bohemian Waxwing
Cedar Waxwing

LONGSPURS AND SNOW BUNTINGS
Lapland Longspur
Snow Bunting

NEW WORLD WARBLERS
Ovenbird
Northern Waterthrush
Black-and-white Warbler
Tennessee Warbler
Orange-crowned Warbler
Nashville Warbler
Mourning Warbler
Common Yellowthroat
American Redstart
Cape May Warbler
Northern Parula
Magnolia Warbler
Bay-breasted Warbler
Blackburnian Warbler
Yellow Warbler
Chestnut-sided Warbler
Blackpoll Warbler
Black-throated Blue Warbler
Palm Warbler
Pine Warbler
Yellow-rumped Warbler
Black-throated Green Warbler
Canada Warbler
Wilson’s Warbler

BUNTINGS AND NEW WORLD SPARROWS
Nelson’s Sparrow
American Tree Sparrow
Chipping Sparrow
Clay-colored Sparrow
Field Sparrow
Fox Sparrow
Dark-eyed Junco
White-crowned Sparrow
White-throated Sparrow
Savannah Sparrow
Song Sparrow
Lincoln’s Sparrow
Swamp Sparrow

CARDINALS AND ALLIES
Scarlet Tanager
Northern Cardinal
Rose-breasted Grosbeak
Indigo Bunting

TROUPIALS AND ALLIES
Bobolink
Red-winged Blackbird
Yellow-headed Blackbird
Rusty Blackbird
Common Grackle
Brown-headed Cowbird
Baltimore Oriole

FINCHES, EUPHONIAS, AND ALLIES
Pine Grosbeak
Purple Finch
White-winged Crossbill
Common Redpoll
Pine Siskin
American Goldfinch
Evening Grosbeak

OLD WORLD SPARROWS
House Sparrow

Peibirders mailing list
Peibirders@lists.upei.ca
http://lists.upei.ca/listinfo/peibirders
Thanks to David Seeler for providing this ornithological data for Prince Edward Island

6 Responses to Birds of PEI

  1. Robert Kelly says:

    Hello

    We are first time visitors to PEI and will arrive for four days next week. Can you tell us where the best birding sites are for this time of year?

    Thank you

    Bob Kelly

  2. Daphne Davey says:

    How do I report a rare bird sighting? Female yellow-headed blackbird in my feeder area (ground-feeding finch seed with starlings, pigeons, juncos, etc., on Boxing Day. I tried to sign up for Nature PEI bird e-list and got rejected. Rejection message doesn’t tell me what problem is. Hope to hear from list administrator soon!

    I reported Rare Bird sighting to Project FeederWatch but they want a photo for official record. I hope she comes back again as I couldn’t get a closeup yesterday, just one of her perching in nearby tree. But ID’ing her was a no-brainer! Only a few feet away from window.

    Please respond. It’s pretty exciting (:>))

    Inkerman Road, Crapaud

  3. Fr. Frank Jay says:

    May 3 saw a “Brown Thrasher” at 2190 Church Road Rustico at 7 PM. Bird was in a spruce tree at the border of the St. Augustine’s Church property and the new French school. Beautiful song!

  4. Walshie says:

    What about Greater Shearwaters? Saw what I assumed to be the same one on an almost daily basis for well over a week this August off the northern shore of PEI (just off North Rustico harbor). I was fishing Mackerel and was dually entertained by it’s habit of scouring for underwater prey by swimming with it’s head beneath the surface as well as by the tenacity with which it would defend itself when encroached upon by much larger birds, mostly Great Black-backed Gulls. I’ve never seen them here before but do not usually spend much time on the water off our northern shore during late summer. Was told by another fisherman that he’s seen them before, likely true but possibly misinformation or confusion with a Sooty Shearwater.

  5. David Seeler says:

    Thank you for the reports! I have added the species mentioned to the 2012 List.
    All the best for 2013 & Good Birding
    David Seeler
    Seeler@upei.ca

  6. WKitts says:

    A California Gull has been hanging around the parking lot where I live in Summerside – October 29-30, 2014. I “snowbird” in California so have only ever seen them there. I looked up info online and it says California Gulls never venture further west than Manitoba.

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